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20110701
20110731
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at the top of the empire. rebecca brooks resigned as the fallout continues. after years with barely a drop of rain, some regions in kenya are paying a hefty price. >> normally, this area would be teeming with cattle and goats, but as you can see, it is completely empty. >> and her puzzles have stunned people for decades. now the woman behind those creative crosswords shares the tricks of the trade. ♪ >> and welcome. amid a firestorm of conspiracy today -- controversy today, two tendered their resignations. first it was rebecca brooks, a dog by allegations over her role in the scandal and illegal payments to police officers. then this afternoon came word that less hinton -- les hinton is stepping down. this report contains some flash photography. >> it is the day that the chief executive walked away from the company she had served for half her life, the day when her friend and lawyer walked into a hotel to say sorry to the family who was the victim of his papers wrongdoing. rebecca's -- rebecca brooks is the highest standing casualties so far. as for the past 10 days she has been at the
? >> this is "bbc world news america. " the fallout from the hacking scandal continues as rebekah brooks resigned and rupert murdoch issues an apology. after years with barely a drop, some regions of kenya are paying a hefty price. >> normally, this area would be teeming with cattle and goats. as you can see, it is completely empty. >> the woman behind the creative crosswords shares tricks of the trade. ♪ >> amid a firestorm of controversy, rebekah brooks resigned as chief executive of news international. there are allegations of her role in the phone hacking scandal and illegal payments to police officers. she said she felt a deep responsibility to the people hurt. rupert murdoch apologized to the family of milly dowler, murdered girl whose hacked phone started the controversy. >> she is the most high-profile casualty so far in the scandal that has spread to both sides of the atlantic. for the past 10 days, rebekah brooks has been a part of the storm that has swept rupert murdoch's empire and remained by his side. today, she decided to step away. she said that recent times have been tough and
today is not the end of the story but with the resignation of rebecca brooks on tuesday, this is a story which will run for months if not years with police investigations, judicial inquiries, lawsuits and any number of other threats still piling up against the company, but it's a significant day. >> charlie: the president's press conference, global implications for europe and the united states and the rupert murdoch case. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: every story needs a hero we can all root for. who beats the odds and comes out on top. additional funding provided by these funders: but this isn't just a hollywood storyline. it's happening every da all across america. every time a storefront opens. or the midnight oil is burned. or when someone chases a dream, not just a dollar. they are small business owners. so if you wanna root for a real hero, support small business. shop small. additional funding pvided by these funders: captioning sponsored b rose communications from our studios in new york citythiss charlie rose. >> charlie: president obama had a press con
and said that what happened under rebekah brooks' leadership." she was editor of the "news of the world," at the time some of the hacking. she was apparently away at the time. murdoch's enemies have long claimed that whoever is in power is the real puppet master. tonight, he, they, no one knows how this will end. >> joining me now from london is the deputy prime minister went tony blair was in power. 45 of his mobile phone messages were hacked into. this is a very sorry tale. it goes back to 2006 when your own messages were broken into. how evasive was that? >> the police kept in mind that that was so. i had to go to the court and force them to commit and setup a new inquiry. that is finding all of disinformation. the information was available before. why didn't the police act on it instead of the nine that my phone messages had been broken into? now we are learning the appalling situation of the phone's not only having messages on them, the girl found that not only were they wiped off, they were wiped off by the news of the world to add more information so they could get more stories s
brooks, the conservative, described, a party that will not compromise the matter how sweet the deal for the site might be and how great consequences for our nation. >> hariri is talking about conservative "new york times - -- have we read it is talking about conservative "new york times" columnist david brooks, wrote that the republican party is no longer a normal party. its members, he says, don't accept the logic of compromise. >> forgive me, i have to correct your copy again. he is a great calmness, but he's not conservative -- great columnist, but he's not conservative. he is moderate. >> moderate conservative. >> no, he is moderate, open to all views. what you are saying, if you hear eric cantor john boehner, we are ready for tax reform, which was done in the mid-1980's. you cut out the loopholes and you use the money to cut rates. you get the fairness. rich don't have advantages by having the lobbyists create loopholes and exploit them. you stimulate economic growth because the loopholes and in and of themselves is starting economically and the low rates encourage economic act
that it is an insult to the family that rebekah brooks, the editor of "news of the world" at the time, is still at her post in news international? >> i've made very clear she was right to resign. that resignation should have beenccepted. there needs to be root and branch change at this entire organization. >> mr. speaker, i thank the prime minister for that answer and he's right to take the position that rebekah brook should go. and i hope you will come to the debate that rupert murdoch should drop his bid for b sky b, should rise the world has changed and should listen to this house of commons. >> i agree with what the right old gentleman has said and i think it's good that the house of commons is going to speak with one voice. >> this evidence casts serious doubt on mr. coleson's ashurntss that the phone hacking over which he resigned was an isolated example of illegal activities. the prime minister says the chief of staff is not passed on this very serious information. can he now tell us what information he proposes t take against the chief of staff? >> i have given, i think, the fullest possible a
by trying to throw a plate of shaving cream at rupert murdoch. following the murdoch's rebecca brook who's resign head of operations last friday and arrest and questions by police on sunday. brooks, a former editor of news of the world denied prior knowledge of the phone alletions but apologized to the victims. >> it was cruel and i have regrets. just the idea that phone access was by someone of the news of the world is abhorrent to me as it is to everyone in this room and it's ultimate regret the speed in which we have found out and tried to find out the bottom of the investigations have been too slow. i think james a rupert both accepted that earlier and we're endeavoring to continue to continue to investigate. but of course there are regrets. don't know anyone in their right mind who would authorized no sanction approval for anyone listening to the voice mails of those circumstances. i don't know anyon who would think it was the right and proper thing to do at this time or at any time. >> charlie: also appearing s sir paul hnson the head of scotland yard who resigned sunday. the heari
of the empire is rebecca brooks, editor at the time of the alleged hacking. company executives say that she was away at the time. this began with the imprisonment for years ago of editor clive goodman. >> i made a statement yesterday. with judicial restraints, i can make no more at the moment. >> it is his reams of notes of private phone numbers that have fueled this saga, that and the mounting anger of mps who alleged the police simply did not want to investigate what he had done. rupert murdoch issued a statement describing what had happened as deplorable and unacceptable, stating the company must fully cooperate with the police, and adding that would happen under rebecca brooks's leadership. murdoch's enemies have long claimed that whoever is in power, he is the puppet master. tonight, no one knows how this extraordinary drama will and. nick robinson, bbc news, westminster. >> for more on this extraordinary drama, i spoke to a bbc reporter in london. i asked about bribes to london police officers. >> it seems every hour a new revelation has come about. we have even been told to be braced
pressure on the president's friend, rebecca brooks. she is the editor of "news of the world" when the girl went missing. she, like other former executives at the paper, has always said she did not know about the actions of a few rogue reporters. "news international was "says she is as shocked that anyone -- as shocked as anyone else. but she says she does not intend to resign. >> she has been clear today that is what she will not do. this happened in 2002 and she's chief executive of a company in 2011 and she is absolutely determined to get to the bottom of this issue. >> but the political heat has been turned up on record murdoch's news empire. the house of commons will debate the latest allegations on wednesday. opposition politicians say they want a full inquiry set up. they think rebecca brooks should go. >> its more than a wrote reporter. was not just one individual. this is a systematic things that happen. what i want is to start taking responsibility for this. >> it is not just "news international" with difficult questions to answer. the police said a phone hacking was used to targe
. >> my message to rebekah brooks is do the decent thing. it cannot hide away from this level of public english. >> they were reluctant witnesses. they told the committee he could not attend the future session. james murdock said he could not come. rebekah brooks said chiappone -- welcome the opportunity to do so but would not discuss anything that relates to the ongoing police investigation. the talk was of a formal summons. the threat had worked. they change their minds but they would now be coming to answer m.p.'s questions. in the second letter, james murdock said we're running to confirm our attendance by -- and concerned where are asked to yet answer further questions in a form on top of the judge let inquiry and the police investigation. whatever the form, the questions keep coming. why did the news of the world mislead and why were some victims paid to keep quiet? as for ms. brooks, she will be asked about what she told mps last time. the m.p. whose committee will be asking the question was optimistic. >> i hope the committee will want to learn the truth. this is not about a lyn
be months before they know how much damage is actually been done. >> brown: and david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off every day. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: americans seeking work, and many hoping to hold on to their jobs, found little
whether he had discussed with rebekah brooks murdoch's now withdrawn $12 billion bid to acquire the mighty british sky broadcasting satellite system. rebekah brooks was murdoch's chief person and the editor at the news of the world in a, quote unquote, personal friend of the prime minister. >> that is why rebekah brooks was quite able to say at the house of commons yesterday that there wasn't a single conversation that coul taken place in front of the select committee. >> question. is cameron insulated by the fact that rupert murdoch and rebekah brooks were also extremely close to the labor party's prime minister, gordon brown? >> no. >> no. >> no. >> especially because gordon brown has come out and said that his medical records were hacked into for a young son with cystic fibrosis. besides, this linked account are the ones that are occurring right now. cameron is acting as though his government could fall. he called for a very strong investigation. i think he will probably eat pie, but he's on very shaky ground. >> let put -- >> my thoughts, please. he's in a coalition government with a l
monitoring. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> suarez: and hari sreenivasan previews the coming clash between the u.s. and japanese teams in the women's world cup final with christine brennan of "u.s.a. today" and abc. >> this is really a little bit about soccer and a lot about nationalism and about, whether it's tidally-winks or soccer, americans want to see americans win. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our history depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off everyday. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoi
, for whatever motive. that is the question that mrs. brooks has to answer. >> we continue this evening with the incredible story of one of the richest women in china, zhang xin. >> from the outside, i hear friends talk about the rise of china, the politicians knowing what they do. in fact, someone mo who ves, works in china, a different picture. chinese are complaining about the government. the government seems to be rolling out of the policies, and managing the everyday problems. and in terms of theconfence ofecoming a superpower, i see -- i just don't see that. >> we conclude this evening with investigative reporter and author ahony somers. he's written a book called "the eleventh day: the fully sotry 9/11 and osama bin laden." >> what we did in the end was, i hope, successfuy to dispatc to sane americans the utmost of the conspiracy theorist ideas. >> send them away? >> yes. >> but i think what happened was that those ideas, the lingering thoughts about them, have distted the facts and have blurred the things that one really should be concerned about. >> lionel barber and catherine
for the final issue. she described the tabloid as a force for good and an old friend. and rebecca brooks, former editor of the news of the world describes her as her dear friend. the two worked together to campaign for sara's law, the public right to know where pedophiles are living. the newspaper gave sara a mobile phone. the guardian claims it is this phone that was illegally accessed. rebecca brooks said that these accusations are particularly upsetting. the idea that anyone on the newspaper knew that sara or the campaign team were targeted is unthinkable. if all of that true it is rank hipock accuracy. it makes you despair of modern journalism. sara's name is at the long list of potential hacking victims and this investigation is far from over. >> in other news around the world taliban militants carried out a major attack in southern afghanistan using suicide bombers, rocket propelled grenades and machine guns. the sustained assault targeted the offices of the deputy govern and a private security firm. the trial of desupposed president will start next week in cairo. he faces charges of corru
with news international bosses, with a rebecca of burke's -- brooks. >> as prime minister, did he ever discuss the question with news international at all the meetings they attend? >> i never had one inappropriate conversation. >> it is the third time of fasting, and labor did not like the answer. >> i took myself out of any decision making about this and did to regard -- about this bid. >> he is accused him of hiding their relationships with the murdoch empire. >> i have set out all the meetings i have had in complete contrast to the party opposite, but i can tell you, i have never held a slumber party. >> david cameron says he has an old-fashioned view that a man is innocent until proven guilty, but today he tried to separate his fate from andy. >> for more on the fallout and the impact it continues to have, i spoke to the chief political correspondent for "the guardian newspaper" in london. did he do enough today to stop questions about his judgment? >> he certainly did announce to south -- did enough to satisfy his party curio reaching his party. he was meant to finish with a trip
on the prime minister's friend, rebekah brooks, chief executive of news international in the u.k., editor at "news of the world" when milly dowler went missing. she has always said she did not know about the actions of a few rogue reporters. she says she is shocked as everyone else. everyone makes it plain that she does not intend to resign. >> this happened in 2002. she is now chief executive of the company. she is absolutely determined to get to the bottom of this issue. >> the heat has been turned up on rupert murdoch's news empire. the house of commons will debate the latest allegations on wednesday. opposition politicians say they want an inquiry set up. they also say that rebekah brooks should go. >> this was a systematic series of things that happened. what i want from executives at news international is for them to start taking responsibility. but it is not just news international -- >> it is not just news international with difficult questions to answer. the latest claims are prompting more uncomfortable questions about whether a blind eye was turnedat scotland yard -- turned at
. >> as for the questions about -- >> on the case of backup brooks -- rebecca brooks, i do not think the prime minister should choose who should run it news organizations. >> david cameron has done his best to try to distance himself from the scandal. questions about his own judgment and his friendship continue. especially now some say they warned him years ago about hiring the former editor. >> president obama, the u.s. economy has been the overriding challenge. today, it comes more disappointing news. only 18,000 jobs were created in june, the fewest in nine months. that pushed up the unemployment rate to 9.2%. in response, the president had this assessment. >> economy is not producing enough jobs for everybody was looking. we have always known that we would have ups and downs. over the past few months, the economy has experienced some tough head winds. >> what more can be done to spur the job growth? how could these figures have fallen so far below expectations? >> a date earlier, many economists are revising upward their forecast. they were expecting around 100,000 jobs to a been created in the mon
and jim byrnes and brooks who created the show, they came to me and said we had a couple of ideas for scripps. just hang in there, like to use you again. what a blessing. you can imagine how thrilling that was. tavis: and the rest, as they say, was history. >> the first year, i did not comment until the fourth year. by then it was a big hit. -- i did not comment until the fourth year. by then it was a big hit. we were sweating the ratings, would they get picked up or not. you cannot imagine that about the mary tyler moore show, but it was an uphill fight. tavis: you have thoughts about the way the television business has changed, back in the day? it would give shows an opportunity to grow and try to find their audience. everything today is about here and now. what do you make of the way business has changed? >> i think audience is the thing that changed. back in those days, you were still the miracle in the corner that people bragged about on the box. now the audience, they have heard every joke, they know every plot line, they know where you are going before you open your mouth.
. the sound heard more often was silence. >> were you -- about your son or rebekah brooks? >> that took 10 seconds to answer. he hesitated on every question of detail. >> i forget but i expect that i have been in daily contact with both of them. >> news international was run day today by james murdoch. today, he blamed the police, complaints commission, and a failed inquiry for the failure to reveal what had gone wrong. >> if i knew then what i know now and with the benefit of hindsight, we would have taken more action are around that and we would have been quicker to get to the bottom of the allegations. >> out different -- how different today was then the days when he was feted by prime ministers. david cameron was never photographed with mr. murdoch even though he was invited discretely just days after the last election. >> why did you go in the back? >> to avoid photographers. i did as i was told. >> he was looking relaxed, then may ham. the drama turned into a circus. >> he was there in that room. what can you tell us? >> i was sitting a few feet away and only just half a second befor
today. >> rebecca brooks, a former editor of "news of the world close "-- news of the world." some feel she should have lost her job. >> she is an executive of news international who was editor at the time the hacking happened. it is a big acts, but i do not think it solves the real issue and news international. >> i am satisfied that rebecca -- her leadership in the business and her standard of ethics, her standard of conduct throughout her career are very good. >> with big consumer company after big consumer company pulling their advertising from quoted news of the world," the commercial future -- from "news of the world," the commercial future was looking bleak. >> it is going to be investigated. there must be a full judicial inquiry. >> here is the other newspaper jewel acquired by rupert murdoch in 1969," the sun." could there be a sunday without a murdoch tabloid? unthinkable, surely. >> despite today's announcement, the fallout from the scandal seems to be far from over. scotland yard say they have identified 4000 possible hacking victims. an inquiry will start into possible wron
david brooks said, as you well know. "if the republican party were a normal party it would take advantage of this amazing moment. it is being offered trillions of dollars in spending cuts in exchange for a few hundred miion dollarofevenue increases. if the debt ceiling talks fail independent voters will see that democrats were willing to compromise but republicans were not. if responsible republicans don't take control, independents will conclude the republican fanaticism caused this default. they will conclude that republicans are not fit to govern and they will be right." david brooks. >> i don't agree that at all. that discounts the notion that the vast majority of people in this country thinkovernment's way too big and if you lo at them... look at what the role of the government is, i think that's a great insiders's vw, i don't think the that represents the view point of people across this country at all. >> rose: okay, but i suspect if the president said to you or you today the president mr. president, do you think the government's too big? would say, yes, i do. >> i think
. >> brown: once the murdochs were done, another central figure in the scandal-- rebekah brooks-- appeared before the committee. she was editor of the now- defunct "news of the world" during the phone hacking, and later became chief executive at the tabloid's british parent firm news international before resigning last week. brooks said she only recently learned that the phone of the young murder victim, milly dowler, had been targeted. >> it seems incredible that you, as the editor, were so unaware of such fundamental issues to do with this investigation. >> i just.. i think... in some ways, just the opposite-- i don't know anyone in their right mind who would authorize, know, sanction, approve of anyone listening to the voice mails of milly dowler in those circumstances. >> brown: brooks was arrested on sunday, and she repeatedly said today there were things she could not discuss due to the ongoing investigation. but she did say she has lasting regrets that everything did not come out long ago. >> of course, i have regrets. i mean, the idea that milly dowler's phone was accessed by someo
a group of comments from the new york time from washington david brooks, with me here in new york, david leonhardt, roger cohen and tom friedman. they have all won too many awards to talk about. mi pleased to have all of them on this program today to talk about america. what's the challenge for us? because wherever i go around the world the thing they say is tt we want america to take care of their business at home first, so that they can lead the world and pla an important part as the rest of the world changes. >> well, charlie, i think the world does understan that america provides a certain degree ofglobal governance and global goods, public goods that stabilize the world and fuel the global economy. i mean to me we are the tent pole that holds up the world. if we buckle your kids won't just grow up in a different america, they will grow up in a different world. and that is what i think what is playing out here is so important. i think our challengright now is to do four things at once. i think we have to stimulate the economy a little more because clearly we're rolling back, there ar
a government default. >> lehrer: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown gets a rare inside look at a syrian city where anti- government demonstrations have grown bigger and bolder from anthony shadid of "the new york times." >> reporter: hama is syria's fourth largest city. it's a significant place, and since last month when security forces withdrew, you've seen, i think, a notion of freedom emerge there. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more, cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off every day. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and
. executive here in the united kingdom. and rebecca brook she's the chief executive over the news corporate newspapers here in the uk and she was editor and chief at the time of some of the most egregious alleged incident. >> do they have the power of a subpoena? >> there's some question about that. news international, the newspaper division has put out a statement saying that both mr. murdock, james murdock and ms. brooks will cooperate. but they didn't say necessarily that they'll testify so there's some question as to what form that cooperation will take. >> what does news international have to say about the latest allegations concerning former prime minister gordon brown? >> well he made these very anguished charges that news corp. had essentially targeted him, had sought to damage him. and interestingly, the allegations involved two newspapers that are not the tabloid news of the world but now we know it's been shuttered because of the role in the growing scandal. he says the times of london, reporters for the excuse me sunday times, had misrepresented themselves in order to obtain pri
taxes with 9.1% unemployment. >> woodruff: columnist david brooks in the "new york times" today criticized what i said was the anti-tax faction in the republican party and said it does not accept the logic of compromise. he said this is a movement with no sense of moral decency because it's prepared for the united states to ignore the debt limit. >> well, mr. brooks apparently is not listening to the people that i'm hearing from in my state and across the country. look, this deal is is not over yet. we still have some time. thankfully between now and august 2 to reach some sort of negotiated outcome. but what i think david brooks underestimates is what it's going to take to pass this. not only through the house but also through the senate. it's going to require 60 votes in the senate. so it will take more than the president having a press conference or having a meeting. we need to come up with a package that can actually pass both branches of the congress between now and august 2. and i just frankly don't think tax increases particularly during a weak economic recovery, are like
brooks who also had to give up her job at news corp and now is under her own suspicion? >> well, she was editor of news of the world which is the paper at the center of all this, as was andy coalson. and basically all of them have been saying they knew nothing about it. they would not have sanctioned it. and there's a great deal of skepticism. basically what'sappening isç everybody involved in this-- and this includes members of the media, politicians, members of parliament, the police-- are all trying to shift the blame on to someone else. indeed when sir paul and john yates resigned they got a parting shot at david cameron for hiring andy coalson. the same thing is happening with rebecca brooks. she's saying she's done nothing wrong. she's quite angry at having been arrested yesterday. and all this willçç gain in intensity at least for the next 48 hours until parliament goes into recess. >> ifill: prime minister cameron cut short his visit to africa and is coming back to prepare for tomorrow, this inquiry being conducted by parliament. what do we expect there? >> well, tomorr
johnson. the criticism of him, by david brooks most recently, is that he's too much like the senate majority leader. the president has a bully pulpit and he used it. the fact that republicans started screaming bloody murder, indicate that they are worried about it. >> charles? >> the problem is this has the feel of a town with a leader who is not leading. he has not proposed a budget t on. the one he proposed was voted down by the senate 97-0, it was so preposterous. we have a president in full campaign mode was not proposing anything at a public -- who knows whether in private. there is no democratic proposal on the table for the budget. he is demagoguing against medicare and the ryan plan. he has decided, do that and that is how you get reelected. that is why the town is laundering. >> consistency has not been a problem with republicans. they endorsed the ryan plan, which does not provide for a balanced budget, and now they are pushing for a balanced budget. 103 house republicans have gone on record as saying they will not vote to raise the debt ceiling unless there is a cap of 18
milly dowler -- phone.owler's hacked this is what rebekah brooks had to say about the incident. >> i don't know anyone in their right mind who would sanction anyone listening to the voice mail of milly dowler in those circumstances. i just don't know anyone who would think that was a right and proper thing to do at this time or any time. i know that we know a lot more now but that is all i can tell you. >> many of the details were first revealed in "the guardian," newspaper. we're joined by the deputy editor tonight. thank you for joining us. do you believe the murdochs did not know about the phone hacking? >> it is very difficult to say. rupert murdoch's performance was quite extraordinary. he seemed to be tried to convince the world that he was a doggery old chap who had no idea what was going on in his company. a lot of the time i felt convinced of that. one of the striking things was that this was probably the end of the rupert murdoch era. this was probably the performance that will convince most shareholders that he is the person to be running this company. >> what about james murd
. >> a series of tragic news stories -- >> and rebecca brooks, former editor, describes sarah payne as her dear friend. the two worked together to campaign for "sarah's law," the public right to know where pedophiles are living. tonight rebecca said these allegations are abhorrent. the idea that anyone on this newspaper knew that sarah or the team were targeted were -- is unthinkable. the sarah's law campaign began in 2004. glenn mulciar was arrested in 2006. if it was news international who intercepted the information, this was the reaction of one m.p. >> news international didn't just campaign for sarah's law. they gave personal support for sarah and her family. they produced literature. they took her to party meetings. >> her newspaper got her high-level meetings and targeted phones. but it's said the voice mail on this phone was not activated until 18 months ago, suggesting there were no messages. today's allegations surfaced hours after lord justice lev son said his judicial inquiry could begin while the police begin to n.f.c. >> i believe it should be problem to focus on the extent of the
is gordon at downing street. on the top is rebekah brooks. for years, team brown stayed close to teamer, but no more -- team murdoch, but no more. he is accusing "news of the world" of using criminals to investigate his private life. >> i had my bank account broken into, my files, i tax returns went missing -- my tax returns went missing. medical return -- medical records have been broken into. i do not know how this happens. but i do know that in two of these instances, there is absolute proof that news international was responsible for hiring people to get this information. the people that they work with -- and this is what concerns me most -- our criminals. >> are you considering resigning? >> he is not resigning. he said his newspaper has been down to bring him -- has been out to bring him down. he attacks the way that it reported his youngest son was suffering from cystic fibrosis. he did not allege that his sons records had been stolen, but -- son's records had been stolen. >> your son will now be broadcast the media. we are incredibly upset about it. we're thinking about his long
krugman and david brooks th columnists at the "new york times". this conversation took pla before the president's press conference and therefore was edited accordingly. >> whave no consensus in our political system. there is no center. we have no consensus about what all to be happening. so if you try to strike a lo-term deal you're basically stking a deal that nobody actually beeves and that isot going to be adhered to. i think we buy we buy se time. shouldn't be negotiating at all about the debt ceiling but we buy someime and give the voters another chance to weigh in. >> we really need to cut i think some of the rating agencies have said this, we need to cut $4 trillion to sort of stabilize debt levels and if we don't do that that's really bad news. and then the second thing i do think both parties may find it useful to have a framework. no, we're to the going to write a plan that is going to dictate the next ten years of politics but both parties may find it extremely useful to have a framework going forward and believe me none of these plans are very specific. there's a lot o
street machine. >> warner: the fate of another former top "news of the world" editor rebekah brooks remains unclear. for now, she remains c.e.o. of the paper's parent company in britain, news international. there may be implications for murdoch's proposed $12 billion takeover of the cable television network british sky broadcasting as well. his news corporation already owns three other newspapers in britain and, in this country, "the wall street journal", "fox news" and the "new york post" among others. this afternoon, reports surfaced that the company might replace the sunday "news of the world" with another murdoch publication. its sister paper "the sun" -- published weekly and saturday-- could add a sunday edition. for more on this story, we turn to ned temko, a writer for the "observer" newspaper in london. ned, welcome back, thanks for being with us. so what was the thinking behind this dramatic decision to shut down this very profitable newspaper? >> well, the best description i've heard this evening is that this is the first newspaper in history to die of shame. but that's no
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